19
Mar

Instant Pot Hard Boiled Eggs

The kids and I made homemade, natural egg dyes the other day. I'm working on sharing those with you here on the blog, but this post on how to cook hard boiled eggs in the Instant Pot needed to come first! I'm so excited for the natural dye post. Asher absolutely loved learning about the foods that were used to make the dyes and we had so much fun experimenting with the different colors and the outcomes.

I've tried every method of hard boiling eggs. All of the tricks that supposedly made peeling them easier. I used to use a stove top method by Alton Brown that I thought was the best. But peeling the eggs still took forever, and I still occasionally lost some whites to the shells. I started experimenting with cooking them in an electric pressure cooker, and will never go back to the stove again!

Let me first say, don't have expectations of shorter cooking times compared to the stovetop. It still takes about the same amount of time, if not a couple of minutes longer, to cook them. The real draw here is cooking consistency and the ease of peeling. When you do them in the Instant Pot, they cook evenly every single time. And the shells. Well, they practically fall off. You will never have mangled egg white shells for deviled eggs again with this method.

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Instant Pot Hard Boiled Eggs



AUTHOR:

Ingredients:

  • 6 to 12 eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups water

Instructions:

  1. To prepare the eggs, add 1 1/2 cups water to an electric pressure cooker (I use this Instantpot). Place as many eggs as you can in a single layer to fill the bottom of a steamer basket or on the wire rack that comes with the machine. Depending on the size of your machine, you may need to do these in 2 batches.
  2. Secure the lid, and be sure to set the nozzle to pressure. Set the machine to manual for 5 minutes at high pressure. It will take the pressure cooker a few minutes to build to pressure and then the timer will start counting down. Once the timer is done, do a quick pressure release immediately so the eggs stop cooking.
  3. Place the hot eggs into cool water to halt the cooking process and make them cool enough to handle. Peel immediately, or place them in the fridge if you are making the deviled eggs or dying them the next day.

Note: a cook time of 5 minutes will yield yolks cooked almost completely, like in the photos. If you like more of a runny yolk, reduce the time to 3-4 minutes. If you like it a little more cooked, increase time to 6-7 minutes. You may also need to play with the time depending on the sizes of your eggs. Mine were standard sized large eggs. 



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